In ancient times, the spirits of Saana and Halti were worshipped to guarantee a good hunt. Today, these sacred fells still leave you speechless.

At 1324 metres, Halti is Finland’s highest fell, whereas Saana (1029 m) is the most recognisable. Halti lies close to the border between Finland and Norway, with marked hiking and skiing trails starting from Kilpisjärvi.

Scrambling up to the top of Saana is a challenge worth doing. The longest set of stairs in Finland helps you at the steepest part of the four kilometer journey; two kilometers of solid wooden steps with lookout platforms. You are free to hike along the marked trails, but entrance to the Saana Nature Reserve and Research Area is forbidden between 15 May and 1 September. You may spot a surprise or two when you hike through the unforgiving environment – such as one of the many rare species of butterflies.

A little different way to hike to the top of Halti fell.

Halti is within the Käsivarsi wilderness area. Käsivarsi is Finland’s second largest wilderness area. It is located in the northwest corner of the municipality of Enontekiö and has an area of 220 630 hectares. There are no roads within the wilderness area, but the area is not uninhabited. Raittijärvi Lapp village is in the area and some families live there for the majority of the year.

Saana is located right by the village Kilpisjärvi, visible from all corners of the area. It is said to be the best known fell in Finland, due to its easily recognisable shape.

More information about the outdoors possibilities at the Käsivarsi wilderness area you can find from the Metsähallitus outdoors pages.